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Platypus Affiliated Society European Conference
17.02.2017 18:00h
Platypus Affiliated Society European Conference
 
For the third time the Platypus Affiliated Society hosts its European Conference and we are happy to announce the University of Vienna as this years location. The program includes two panel discussions on the Politics of Critical Theory and the Crisis of Neoliberalism as well as several workshops.

FRIDAY February 17

18:00 Opening Remarks
19:00 The Politics of Critical Theory

SATURDAY February 18

13:00 Geduld und Theorie. Zur Politik der kritischen Theorie heute
Dirk Lehmann und Anne Koppenburger, Bielefeld
15:00 the right to stay and the right to go: the struggle for freedom of
movement and against neo-colonial exploitation
Afrique Europe Interact, Vienna

19:00 The Crisis of Neoliberalism

The Conference will be held in Room HS7, Building UZA2 (Geography Building), University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien

Close public transport stations:
U4/U6, Spittelau
D Tram, Althanstraße

THE POLITICS OF CRITICAL THEORY

Recently, the New Left Review published a translated conversation
between the critical theorists Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer
causing more than a few murmurs and gasps. In the course of their
conversation, Adorno comments that he had always wanted to ‘develop a theory that remains faithful to Marx, Engels and Lenin, while keeping up with culture at its most advanced.’ Adorno, it seems, was a Leninist. As surprising as this evidence might have been to some, is it not more shocking that Adorno’s politics, and the politics of Critical Theory, have remained taboo for so long? Was it really necessary to wait until Adorno and Horkheimer admitted their politics in print to understand that their primary preoccupation was with maintaining Marxism’s relation to bourgeois critical philosophy such as Kant and Hegel? This panel proposes to state the question as directly as possible and to simply ask: How did the practice and theory of Marxism, from Marx to Lenin, make possible and necessary the politics of Critical Theory?

Chris Cutrone, Platypus Affilated Society, Chicago
Martin Suchanek, Workers Power, Berlin
Haziran Zeller, Berlin


THE CRISIS OF NEOLIBERALISM

The Left has for over a generation – for more than 40 years, since the crisis of 1973 – placed its hopes in the Democratic and Labour Parties to reverse or slow neoliberal capitalism – the move to trans-national trade agreements, the movement of capital and labor, and austerity. The post-2008 crisis of neoliberalism, despite phenomena such as SYRIZA, Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring and anti-austerity protests more generally, Bernie Sanders's candidacy, and Jeremy Corbyn's Labour leadership, has found expression on the avowed Right, through UKIP, Brexit, the U.K. Conservatives' move to "Red Toryism" and now Donald Trump's election. The old neoliberal consensus is falling apart, and change is palpably in the air. Margaret Thatcher's infamous phrase "There Is No Alternative" has been proven wrong. What can the Left do to advance the struggle for socialism under such circumstances?

In the 1960s the Left faced political and social crises in an era of full employment and economic growth. Departing from official Communism, which had largely supported the development of the welfare state in industrialized capitalist countries, many on the Left challenged the existing political order, of Keynesian-Fordism, through community organising on the principle of expanding individual and collective freedom from the state. Against Keynesian economic demands, many of these Leftists supported the Rights efforts, to integrate formerly oppressed identity groups into the corporate professional-managerial class. Since the 1970s, the significance of the fact that all these aims were taken up, politically, by the Right, in the name of ‘freedom’, in the form of neo-liberalism is still ambiguous today.

Some on the Left have understood this phase of ‘neo-liberalism’ to be continuous with the post-war Fordist state, for example in Ernest Mandel’s conception of “late capitalism” and David Harvey’s idea of “post-Fordism”. The movement of labor and capital was still administered by the Fordist state. Distinctively, others on the Left have opposed neo-liberalism for over a generation through a defence of the post-war welfare state, through appeals to anti-austerity and anti-globalisation.

How does this distinction within the Left between the defense of the welfare state and the defense of individual freedom affect the Left’s response to the crisis of neo-liberalism? Why has the Left recently supported attempts to politically manage the economic crisis post-2008, against attempts at political change? How can the Left struggle for political power, with the aim of overcoming capitalism and achieving socialism, when the political expression of the crisis of neoliberalism has largely come from the Right, and Trump won the election in November?

Chris Cutrone, Platypus Affiliated Society, Chicago
Boris Kargalitzky, Institute of Globalisation Studies and Social
Movements, Moskau
John Milios, former Chief economic advisor of SYRIZA, Athens
Emmanuel Tomaselli, Funke Redaktion , International Marxist Tendency, Wien
 
 
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UZA II. Uni Wien, Althanstraße 14, 1090 Wien